I’ve seen it dozens of times…and in hundreds of posts on travel blogs…People preparing their trip to Italy armed with a laundry list of everything they want to do – see – experience. For many it’s a once-in-a-lifetime trip, for others, the gateway to many more to follow after they – and their kids – get the travel bug. But, like a buffet at the most wondrous food court on earth, the extent of choices can be overwhelming – and trying to stuff five different desserts down the hatch, even nauseating. Italy doesn’t disappoint, but families wear themselves out trying to hit everything on a list of earthly delights, despite their kids’ ages or attention spans (not to mention jet lag).
Change your family holiday from This………… To this. The Arte al Sole way!
With Arte al Sole, we often suggest families split up, to the great satisfaction of both parents and kids. Kids will still dive deep in a learning experience, while the make masks in Venice, or create their own vision of Rome’s Forum. Later, they show-off their knowledge when walking down streets and spotting a familiar coat-of-arms.
Or, families work together on an art project, with your kids thrilled to be doing something ‘fun’ with you, or visit the Uffizi Gallery while focusing on what appeals to them so they can learn all about it. We discourage two (crowded) museums in a single day — Try ducking into one that’s lesser known, it will be astounding nonetheless (

If you have just one day in the city, sure, visit a museum but then enjoy the city streets. Italy is nothing if not an open air museum. Our summer day camps allow parents to share some grownup time – wandering through museums, taking time over a leisurely lunch, visiting a winery, museum or taking a cooking class. All while your kids take a deep dive into the life and times of the city. Parents tell us that their children then astound them with they’re newfound knowledge! By slowing down your days, you may inspire a young person to dream of becoming an architect, archeologist, top chef, a glass blower or historian. Rushing from city to city or museum to museum may have just the opposite effect. That’s why, especially with younger kids, we often suggest spending time in Villa Borghese park with its merry-go-round, zoo or go-carts or having a picnic in Florence’s Boboli Gardens. Kids instinctively want to spend time in nature – it may be the highlight of their trip. And yours.

For more things to do with kids in Italy, check out ItaliaKids.com For our Day Camps in Florence, Rome, Lucca, Umbria & Sicily, check out our full roster. And for our private tours and excursions, check out our suggestions by city, and then select just one per day!And finally, enjoy your trip!
Got older kids? Try our Life Skills & Learning program in the Dolomites 28 July to 4 August 2019!